Traffic engineering

The following documents and drawings provide traffic management guidance to practitioners involved in traffic engineering, road design and road safety. In this section you’ll find information relating to road signs, traffic control, managed freeways and public transport.

The Traffic Engineering Manual Volume 1 – VicRoads Supplements to Austroads Guide to Traffic Management provides guidance to practitioners in relation to infrastructure used to manage road users on roads managed by VicRoads. Councils are welcome to adopt such guidance for the management of municipal roads.

VicRoads and all other State Road Authorities are working towards greater consistency in how road networks are managed across Australia.   In order to achieve this, the Austroads Guide to Traffic Management and Australian Standards relating to traffic management have been adopted to assist in providing consistency and harmonisation across all jurisdictions.  This agreement means that these Austroads Guides and Australian Standards are the primary technical references.

All supplements must be read in conjunction with the national Austroads and Australian Standards documents.

The Traffic Engineering Manual Volume 2 – VicRoads Supplements provides guidance to practitioners in relation to infrastructure used to manage road users on roads managed by VicRoads. Councils are welcome to adopt such guidance for the management of municipal roads.

VicRoads and all other State Road Authorities are working towards greater consistency in how road networks are managed across Australia.   In order to achieve this, the Austroads Guide to Traffic Management and Australian Standards relating to traffic management have been adopted to assist in providing consistency and harmonisation across all jurisdictions.  This agreement means that these Austroads Guides and Australian Standards are the primary technical references.

All supplements must be read in conjunction with the national Austroads and Australian Standards documents.

The Traffic Engineering Manual Volume 3 – VicRoads Supplements provides guidance to practitioners in relation to infrastructure used to manage road users on roads managed by VicRoads. Councils are welcome to adopt such guidance for the management of municipal roads.

VicRoads and all other State Road Authorities are working towards greater consistency in how road networks are managed across Australia.   In order to achieve this, the Austroads Guide to Traffic Management and Australian Standards relating to traffic management have been adopted to assist in providing consistency and harmonisation across all jurisdictions.  This agreement means that these Austroads Guides and Australian Standards are the primary technical references.

All supplements must be read in conjunction with the national Austroads and Australian Standards documents.


The Managed Freeway Manuals are a series of documents, issued by VicRoads to provide guidance for the selection and design of traffic management treatments for freeway flow management.

Managed Freeway Guidelines


These guidelines provide information for the selection of treatments and devices on freeways.

Managed Motorway Framework

This Framework provides the rationale and supporting evidence behind the active management of Victoria's motorway (also referred to as freeway) network.

Managed Motorway Framework - March 2017 [PDF 21Mb}

Freeway Ramp Signal Handbook


 The Freeway Ramp Signal Handbook provides planning and design information for entry ramp traffic signals, and an overview of the coordinated ramp signals system.

The Handbook standardises ramp signals design to ensure that drivers experience consistent and clear guidance, and that ramp signals are effective in controlling entry ramp traffic.

​The first major implementations of ramp signals in Victoria (in accordance with this Handbook) are on the M1 and M80 freeways; design and installation of ramp signals on other freeways should be consistent with this Handbook to assist driver understanding and achieve effective operation across the state.

Managed Freeway Handbook for Lane Use Management, Variable Speed Limits and Traveller Information


The Managed Freeway Handbook for Lane Use Management, Variable Speed Limits and Traveller Information is VicRoads primary reference for planning, designing and operating lane use and incident management, variable speed limits and traveller information tools on freeways.
This Handbook provides principles and standards for:
  • lane use and incident management
  • variable speed limits
  • traveller information tools.
The tools documented in this handbook assist in improving safety and operation, and keeping motorists informed about travelling conditions. They are particularly beneficial in relation to managing:
  • incidents and other events
  • roadworks
  • periods of congestion.
​The tools combine with access control using coordinated freeway ramp signals to manage freeway flow and achieve high levels of safety, efficiency and reliability. In the interests of uniformity, other Victorian road authorities are encouraged to apply the requirements of this handbook to freeways/tollways under their control.


VicRoads has developed guidelines for planning and operating public transport on roads. The guidelines are designed to help VicRoads and other organisations that provide for public transport to integrate the needs of public transport into their day-to-day work.

Bus stop guidelines


Bus stops are an important part of the public transport network, providing services for both passengers and vehicles. The Bus Stop Guidelines take into consideration the passenger waiting areas and the bus stopping areas, with particular reference to DDA compliance and the passenger facilities which should be incorporated. VicRoads Supplement to AGRD Part 4 - Intersection and crossings - General [PDF 833 Kb] provides guidance in the development of new and upgraded bus stops on the network.

Shoulder bus stop guidelines


Bus stops found in urban and rural areas have different criteria than those found in metropolitan Melbourne. The Shoulder Bus Stop guidelines are intended to provide information on the design and intended operation of both passenger waiting and bus stopping areas for buses.
Shoulder Bus Stop Guidelines [PDF 254 Kb]

Tram priority guidelines


Providing priority for trams is an important way of managing congestion on the roads by increasing the attractiveness of tram services. The travel time and reliability of tram services can be improved by providing trams with road space clear of other vehicles, increased traffic signal time and priority and by a range of other traffic management measures.
VicRoads is currently reviewing the Tram Priority Guidelines.

Tram stops design


To meet road design needs for the construction of platform tram stops in medians and safety zones, Road Design Notes are provided.

Road Design Notes 03-02 - Accessible tram stops in medians [PDF 471 Kb]
Road Design Note 03-03 - Accessible tram stops in safety zones [PDF 401 Kb]

Taxi rank guidelines


VicRoads has released a set of guidelines for the installation and development of taxi ranks which tackle issues such as taxi rank location, pedestrian facilities and DDA compliance, and the needs of the vehicles.

The prime purpose of tourist signing is to give visitors direction or guidance to tourist attractions and accommodation. Although standard tourist signs provide some promotional benefits to tourism businesses, this is not their primary role.

Tourist signs with names

The Tourist Signing Guidelines aim to:
  • provide quality signs to assist tourists with finding attractions, accommodation and visitor information centres
  • provide signs that are of a high standard - simple, clear and readable
  • restrict the number of signs at one location to ensure readability and avoid driver distraction
  • reduce roadside clutter and visual pollution created by uncontrolled and inappropriate signs
  • provide consistent application and administration of tourist signing across the State.

Principles for signing to tourist attractions and accommodation

  • The purpose of the sign is not for advertising the business. Although tourist signs have some promotional role, the primary role is to assist navigation.
  • Signing is provided to genuine tourist attractions and accommodation services.
  • Promotional pictorial signs are provided as part of a statewide tourism signing strategy.
  • Generally, signs are provided from the nearest arterial road, as long as this is no more than 10 km from the establishment in rural areas or 2 km from the establishment in urban areas.
  • The number of tourist destinations on signs facing a driver approaching an intersection from one direction is limited to three.
  • How to apply for a sign permit?Applications seeking approval to place tourist or services signs within a road reserve should be lodged with the officer in charge of tourist signing at the relevant Municipal Council.

Application forms for tourist attractions, accommodation and services signs are available below.

Information for tourism businesses. 

The brochure below provides the following advice to the operators/owners of tourism businesses in Victoria:

  • whether the business is eligible for tourist signs
  • if so, where can the signs be placed
  • how an application can be made, and
  • who pays for the sign manufacture and installation.
The purpose of this brochure is to explain the principles for providing signs to individual tourist attractions and accommodation establishments. The brochure supplements the Tourist Signing Guidelines which provide further detail.

Wine tourism signing guidelines. 

Wine tourism is one of Victorian’s core tourism strengths. There are now over 460 wineries in Victoria, with many offering cellar door sales.

These guidelines have been prepared to ensure a consistent and integrated approach to wineries and wine region signing throughout the State of Victoria. The guidelines fall within the provisions of the Tourist Signing Guidelines, VicRoads Traffic Engineering Manual Volume. 2: Signs and Markings and the Australian Standard AS 1742.6.

Applications for wine region gateway and reassurance signing should be made in writing to the relevant VicRoads regional office. Applications should address the key selection criteria as identified in these guidelines, including supporting documentation. If deemed eligible, the extent and location of signing for the wine region will be determined by VicRoads and Tourism Victoria.


There are numerous technical documents available to practitioners to assist with the development and implementation of bicycle infrastructure treatments on VicRoads managed roads.

Practitioners need to be aware that national technical documents Austroads guides and Australian Standards are the primary technical references.

​Austroads has a published document available free of charge called “Cycling Aspects of Austroads Guides”. This document is a good starting point for those wishing to gain an understanding of guidance available throughout the Austroads guides in relation to bicycle infrastructure treatments.

At Australian Standards level, bicycle infrastructure treatments are mainly covered in AS 1742.9 – Bicycle Facilities and AS 2890.3 – Bicycle Parking Facilities. Refer Australian Standards.

VicRoads also has additional information available through its supplements and additional guidance contained in Volume 1-3 of the VicRoads – Traffic Engineering Manual.

Background

Currently, Victoria is the only State in Australia to use a 'continuous line' pattern  for turn lines and pedestrian crosswalk lines at signalised intersections, and pedestrian crosswalk lines at both pedestrian operated signals and children's crossings.

VicRoads has changed its practice regarding linemarking for turn lane lines and pedestrian crosswalk lines at signalised intersections, and crosswalk lines at Pedestrian Operated Signals and children's crossing, to be consistent with other jurisdictions in Australia.

An example of what this change in practice would look like can be seen in the aerial photograph below.

Changes to Linemarking Practice – Intersections and Pedestrian Crossings

Example of the broken line pattern used at an intersection in Queensland

When was this change adopted?

In November 2015, Victoria adopted the 'broken line' pattern for these types of lines to achieve greater consistency with other states and territories within Australia, and to align with current Australian Standards. Any new signalised intersections, pedestrian operated signals or children's crossings in Victoria will follow the 'broken line' pattern. VicRoads expects that at existing locations, changes to these types of lines from the 'continuous line' pattern to the 'broken line' pattern will occur over time.

Are the Victorian Road Rules and road users affected by this change?

The Victorian Road Safety Road Rules 2009 already refer to the 'broken line' pattern for these types of lines, along with the 'continuous line' pattern. As such, there will be no changes required to the Road Rules and therefore, no need for motorists or pedestrians to modify their usual behaviour in these circumstances.

Information for Traffic and Transport practitioners, and civil contractors

‘Broken Line’ pattern specifications

The specifications for the 'broken line' pattern at signalised intersections and pedestrian operated signals (refer to Clauses 6.2.2 and 6.2.4 of AS 1742.14), and at Children’s Crossings (outlined in Clause 7.2(a)(ii) of AS 1742.10) are as follows.

Crosswalk lines

  • At signalised crossings, the pattern comprises a 150 mm wide line, with 1 m line segments and 300 mm gaps.
  • At children’s crossings, the pattern comprises a 150 mm wide line, with 1 m line segments and 200 mm gaps.

Turn lines 

  • The pattern comprises a 100 mm wide line, with 600 mm line segments and 600 mm gaps.

Transition strategy

The following strategy has been adopted to transition to the broken line standard at signalised intersections, pedestrian operated signals or children’s crossing. 

Where an existing intersection, pedestrian operated signals or children’s crossing is being resurfaced, which contains turn lines and/or pedestrian crosswalk lines of the previous continuous line pattern, the guidance below shall be followed:

Crosswalk lines

  • If the works involve the removal of the crosswalk lines entirely, then crosswalk lines in the new broken pattern shall be installed. 
  • If only a portion of the crosswalk line is removed (e.g. only one of the two lines), then a crosswalk line using the previous continuous line pattern should be installed to match the rest of the existing line.

Turn lines

  • If the works involve the removal of the entire turn line, then a turn line in the new broken pattern shall be installed. 
  • If only a portion of the turn line is removed (e.g. only half of the line), then a turn line using the previous continuous line pattern shall be installed to match the rest of the existing line.

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​Contact us

We encourage and welcome your feedback about our technical documents in the Traffic Engineering Manual. Your input helps us to continually improve the publication.  

If you have any improvements you'd like to share please contact VicRoads Traffic Engineering team.

Email: [email protected]
Call: (03) 9854 2417

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