Alcohol & other drugs

A summary of the key road rules about driving when affected by alcohol and other drugs.

Changes to drink-driving penalties

The Victorian Alcohol Interlock Program has expanded with alcohol interlocks now mandatory for more drink-driving offences. From 1 October 2014 more driver licence and learner permit cancellations will be issued for a broader range of drink-driving blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels.

Visit Changes to the alcohol interlock program or download the Getting your licence back [PDF 361kb] brochure for more information.

Combined drink and drug-driving penalties

From 1 August 2015 significant penalties apply if drivers on Victorian roads are caught with both illegal blood or breath alcohol concentration (BAC) levels and illicit drugs in their system. Visit Combined drink and drug-driving offences and penalties for more information.

Alcohol

You cannot drive if you are affected by alcohol or by both illicit drugs and alcohol over the legal limit.

Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) is a measure of how much alcohol is in your body.

If you are a learner, P1, P2, restricted motorcycle rider or a professional driver (e.g., a truck, bus or taxi driver), you must drive with a zero BAC.

Other drivers and those supervising learner drivers, must drive with a BAC under .05.

These rules apply if you are on a public road or on private property.

Breath tests

It is an offence to not:

  • provide a breath or blood sample
  • stop at a booze bus or random breath testing station, or
  • cooperate with Police who are trying to carry out a breath or blood test.

Drugs

You cannot:

  • drive while affected by any drug regardless of whether it is a legal or illegal drug
  • drive while affected by both illicit drugs and alcohol over the legal limit
  • supervise a learner driver if you are affected by illegal drugs.

These rules apply if you are on a public road or on private property.

Saliva tests

Testing for illegal drugs at the roadside is done by taking a saliva sample.

It is an offence to not:

  • provide a saliva or blood sample
  • stop at a random drug testing station, or
  • cooperate with Police who are trying to carry out a saliva, blood or urine test.

Penalties

There are heavy penalties if caught driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or a combination of both, or refusing to be tested.

The rules in detail

The rules regarding driving with alcohol and drugs are published in the Road Safety Act 1986 (External link).

The key rules are in Part 5 - Offences involving alcohol or other drugs.

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