Pop-up Bike Lanes Program

We’re trialling up to 100 kilometres of new and improved bike routes across key inner-Melbourne suburbs to make it easier and safer for people to ride to and from the CBD.

Tell us what you think

Provide your feedback about the proposed pop-ups using our online map.

Your input helps us to understand what’s important to the local community, so we can adapt the design to your area.

Works starting out in Footscray, the City of Port Phillip and Moonee Ponds

We’re improving bike rider safety around Footscray, the City of Port Phillip and Moonee Ponds. For more information, visit our online map: 

About the project

The Pop-up Bike Lanes Program aims to support more people to ride their bikes more easily and safely across inner-Melbourne. To do this, we are trialling a combination of pop-up bike routes on busy roads, new signage and markings along quieter streets and improved access to our off-road bike network. And, to ensure the routes best fit local needs, we’re also working with local councils. 

Our pop-up approach uses temporary infrastructure which can be adjusted in line with community feedback and monitoring. The routes will be in place for 12-18 months and will be removed, or, if successful, may be converted to permanent routes. 

Learn more about what we’re doing and where in the drop-down menus on this page or explore our interactive online map

The online map indicates proposed bike riding routes and does not necessarily show specific roads where pop-up infrastructure will be installed. For many of the roads shown, existing traffic volumes, on-street parking provision, freight routes, road layouts and dimensions present significant challenges to what can be achieved without major capital works.  

Bike rider on a bike path

We’re trialling close to 40kms of new and improved pop-up bike routes across the City of Port Phillip.

The routes include new and improved bike routes across Port Melbourne, Albert Park, Middle Park, St Kilda, St Kida East, St Kilda West and Elwood, and will use temporary infrastructure such as kerb separators, traffic calming, line-marking and wayfinding signage. They also include a separated, bi-directional bike lane along Westbury Street, between Alma Road and Inkerman Street. 

Our pop-up routes in the City of Port Phillip will connect to existing bike routes, stations, schools, shopping precincts, local activity centres and green spaces, and support Council’s Move, Connect, Live 2018-2028 Strategy. 

Pop-Up Bike Lanes Port Phillip Overview Map

View a larger version of the map 

Decision on Kerferd Road

Following extensive community consultation and based on the feedback received, we are withdrawing our proposed designs for the pop-up bike lanes on Kerferd Road. This means we will no longer make any changes to Kerferd Road as part of the Pop-up Bike Lanes Program. Follow the drop-down menu to learn more about what you’ve told us and what we’re doing for the City of Port Phillip routes.


Community feedback

We’ve been consulting with the community on our proposed designs since December 2021. 

The feedback received is invaluable and helps inform our next stage of design to create pop-up bike routes that strike the right balance for everyone in the community. 

You can continue to provide comments and suggestions about the pop-up routes for the duration of the trial via our online map

Read on to learn more about what you’ve told us so far.

Pop up Bike Lanes info graphic 

What you told us: 

  • There was overall support and positive feedback for the proposed routes and safety improvements across the City of Port Phillip.
  • Requests to install more permanent separation between cars and bike riders. 
  • Objection and safety concerns raised about ‘floating parking’ design on Kerferd Road.
  • Calls for further improvements at intersections to increase safety and prioritisation for bike riders and pedestrians. 
  • Suggestions for additional pop-up lanes across the City of Port Phillip.

How we’re responding

Kerferd Road

What did we hear?

Overall support for speed limit reduction, reconfiguration of Kerferd Road to one traffic lane and safety improvements. 

Concerns about congestion and rat running as a result of removing traffic lanes, as well as safety concerns about the speed of cars and bike riders entering Kerferd Road. 

We also heard opposition to the ‘floating parking’ proposal between Canterbury Road and Richardson Street, as well as opposition to parking loss near the intersection of Kerferd Road and Canterbury Road. 

What are we doing?

With all feedback considered, we will withdraw our proposal for pop-up bike lanes on Kerferd Road. This means we will no longer make any changes to Kerferd Road as part of the Pop-up Bike Lanes 

South Shimmy Route – Elwood foreshore to Fitzroy Street, St Kilda via Beach Avenue, Ormond Road, Broadway, Mitford Street, Blessington Street, Gleeson Street, Shakespeare Grove and Acland Street

What did we hear?
Overall support for the South Shimmy Route.
Calls to improve signage, design at Paul Hester Walk Bridge and a request to re-align the proposed route via Ormond Road.

We noted calls for a signalised crossing at Wave Street and Beach Avenue and considerations to use alternative treatment options along the route instead of sharrows.

We also heard requests to reduce the speed limit on Barkly Street to 40km/h and for improvements to traffic lights and crossings at Glen Huntly Road and Elwood Canal to the Bay Trail.

What are we doing?

We will re-align the route of the South Shimmy following community feedback about the Paul Hester Walk Bridge. This will now follow Beach Street, Ormond Road and Broadway. Re-aligning this route will also help support local connections with a direct route to Elwood Village shopping precinct.

Speed limit and pedestrian operated signal changes are beyond the scope of our current program however we will take this on board as part of our long-term active transport planning.  

Treatments: 

  • Light-touch treatments focused on improved safety and connectivity such as line marking
  • Speed cushions along Acland Street, Chaucer Street, Mitford Street and Broadway to reduce vehicle speed
  • New wayfinding signage to help bike riders get to their destination.

Central Shimmy Route – Elwood foreshore to Prahran shimmy route via Dickens Street, Elwood, Williams Street, Nightingale Street, Carlisle Street and Westbury Street

What did we hear?

Overall support for the Central Shimmy Route.

Calls for improved crossing facilities at Dickens Street and Brighton Road and requests for light touch treatments due to heritage streetscapes along the proposed route.

We noted comments about using alternative treatment options along the route instead of sharrows.

We also heard comments about congestion on Westbury Street, particularly during school pick-up and drop-off times.

What are we doing?

We will proceed with the design proposals with minor adjustments following community feedback. This includes installing speed cushions on Westbury Street to help reduce vehicle speed.

We will paint new line markings in yellow – this is to indicate they are part of the pop-up routes trial. However, we’ll use white paint for other improvements to existing line marking to minimise impacts to the streetscape. 

Further improvements to the crossing at Dickens Street and Brighton Road are beyond the scope of our current program however we will take this on board as part of our long-term active transport planning.  

Treatments: 

  • Light-touch treatments focused on improved safety and connectivity such as line marking
  • Speed cushions along Dickens Street, Williams Street and Westbury Street to reduce vehicle speed
  • New wayfinding signage to help bike riders get to their destination
  • A bi-directional bike lane along the central median on Westbury Street between Inkerman Street and Alma Road.

Middle Park Shimmy Route - Williamstown Road, Port Melbourne to Fitzroy Street, St Kilda via Bridge Street, Esplanade West and East, Liardet Street/Richardson St to Kerferd Road then Page Street, Park Road, York Road and Loch Street

What did we hear?
Option A via Richardson Street:

Less support for Richardson Street Option A, than Page Street Option B, as well as general calls for more separated bike lanes along shimmy routes. 

Calls to prioritise bike riders and pedestrians when connecting to the Sandridge Trail. 

We also noted requests to improve the intersection at Cruikshank Street and Esplanade East.

Option B via Page Street: 

More support for improvements on Page Street due to the quieter nature of the street compared to Richardson. 

Requests for improved connections to Albert Park.

We heard comments about safety for residents due to increased bike traffic using local streets. There were also calls for more separated bike lanes on shimmy routes. 

What are we doing?

We will proceed with Option B via Page Street as it will promote a safer option for bike riders and avoid any conflict with buses. 

Page Street is considered an overall safer option and provides better connections within the local area.

Consultation overview: 

  • Option A: 18% support from community feedback 
  • Option B: 29% support from community feedback comments 
  • 53% stated no preference for either option. 

Treatments: 

  • Light-touch treatments focused on improved safety and connectivity such as line marking
  • Speed cushions along Richardson Street, York Street, Loch Street, Bridge Street, Esplanade East, Cruikshank Street and Liardet Street to reduce vehicle speed
  • New wayfinding signage to help bike riders get to their destination.

Albert Park Schools Connector – Beaconsfield Parade to Dorcas Street via Foote Street and Nelson Road

What did we hear?
Overall support for the Albert Park Schools Connector.

Requests for additional links to the CBD, as well as a suggestion to use Smith Street to link to local schools.

We noted comments about using alternative treatment options along the route instead of sharrows.

What are we doing?

The current alignment supports the City of Port Phillip’s Integrated Transport Strategy and provides clear connectivity between schools and Dorcas Street.
We will proceed with the design proposals with minor adjustments following community feedback.

Treatments: 

  • Light-touch treatments focused on improved safety and connectivity such as line marking
  • Speed cushions along Foote Street, Danks Street and Nelson Road to reduce vehicle speed
  • New wayfinding signage to help bike riders get to their destination.

Beaconsfield Parade – Marine Parade

What did we hear?

Overall support for safety improvements, with a number of calls for separated bike lanes along the entirety of the route. We also heard requests to change the speed limit to 40km/h to improve safety along the route.

Jacka Boulevard/Beaconsfield Parade – Cowderoy Street to Shakespeare Grove: calls for additional improvements to signage for bike riders and other road users, along with requests to improve connections between existing trails.
We also heard requests to remove parking along the route, in particular by Donovan’s and on the bend by Cleve Gardens.

Beaconsfield Parade – Pickles Street to Cowderoy Street: requests to install green treatment all along the route and not just at intersections. Calls for separated bike lanes, as well as improvements to the pedestrian crossing at Pickles Street and Beaconsfield Parade. We also noted requests for improvements to signage near the Bay Trail to raise awareness for pedestrians crossing the trail.

Marine Parade – Shakespeare Grove to Beach Avenue: calls for improvements to clearways to help improve safety for bike riders, as well as additional improvements to way finding signage.

What are we doing?

We will proceed with the design proposals with minor adjustments following community feedback.

Our wayfinding strategy will support improvements along the route. We will also explore additional signage and options to help raise awareness for pedestrians crossing the Bay Trail.

Speed reduction and parking removal on arterial roads is beyond the scope of our current program, however this will be noted for future projects.  Modifications to signals at the intersection of Pickles Street/Beaconsfield Parade are beyond the scope of our current program however we will take this on board as part of our long-term active transport planning.

Treatments:

  • Light-touch treatments focused on improved safety and awareness, such as road markings, green coloured surfacing and intersection improvements
  • New wayfinding signage to help bike riders get to their destination
  • At some larger intersections we will provide separated bike lanes, using bolt-down separator kerbs and bollards. 

Armstrong Street 

What did we hear?

Local businesses raised concerns about the proposed improvements, including safety concerns due to the existing number of road users. There was overall support for the proposal from bike riders.  We also heard requests to realign the route to parallel streets due to congestion on Armstrong Street.

What are we doing?

We will proceed with the design proposals with minor adjustments following community feedback.

Armstrong Street is a key local cycling connection and links to the local shopping precinct. 

We will look to install improved signage and wayfinding to raise awareness about people on bikes.  

We will also explore additional wayfinding signage from Beaconsfield Parade to direct people to the Armstrong Street shopping precinct. 

Treatments:

  • Light-touch treatments focused on improved safety and connectivity such as line marking
  • Speed cushions west of Neville Street to reduce vehicle speed
  • New wayfinding signage to help bike riders get to their destination.

Carlisle Street

What did we hear?

Calls for separated bike lanes and alternative treatments to sharrows.

Separated bike lanes on Carlisle Street would require extensive parking removal and a detailed study that is beyond the scope of our current program.

What are we doing?

We will proceed with the design proposals and continue to monitor community feedback.

Treatments:

  • Light-touch treatments focused on improved safety and awareness, such as road markings, green surface treatments and intersection improvements
  • New wayfinding signage to help bike riders get to their destination.

What we’re doing and when

Works for the pop-up bike routes across the City of Port Phillip are scheduled from 25 April to mid-2022. 

We’ll be updating this page, and our online map, with what’s happening, where and when on a regular basis.

If you live on one of our bike routes, watch out for a works notification in your letterbox.  

What to expect

For all works, noise levels will be mostly low, with trucks, people and specialised equipment working near the site. We will minimise disruption to the local area as much as possible; however, some vehicle noise and lights are unavoidable due to safety requirements for our workers and the local community.

Some of the works will be carried out at night to ensure driver and worker safety and to minimise disruptions.

Access to properties and businesses will be maintained at all times throughout the works.

Once works are complete, a thorough clean-up of the site will take place.

Works being carried out are dependent on weather conditions. Therefore, dates are subject to change. 

Works schedule
Location Works carried out Dates and times 

South Shimmy Route 

Elwood foreshore to Fitzroy Street,
St Kilda via Beach Avenue, Ormond Road,
Broadway, Mitford Street, Blessington Street,
Gleeson Street, Shakespeare Grove and Acland Street

 

  • Line marking and surface treatments
  • Speed cushions along Acland Street, Chaucer Street,
    Mitford Street and Broadway
  • Wayfinding signage 

1 May - mid-2022

Work hours:

  • Line marking/surface treatments: 7pm - 6am
  • Speed cushions and signage: 7am - 5pm
 
 
Central Shimmy Route

Elwood foreshore to Prahran shimmy
route via Dickens Street, Elwood, Williams Street,
Nightingale Street, Carlisle Street and Westbury Street
 
  • Line marking and surface treatments
  • Speed cushions along cushions along Dickens Street,
    Williams Street and Westbury Street
  • Wayfinding signage
  • Bi-directional bike lane along the central median on
    Westbury Street between Inkerman Street and Alma Road
 

5 May - mid-2022

Work hours:

  • Line marking/surface treatments: 7pm – 6am
  • Speed cushions and signage: 7am – 5pm
 
 
Middle Park Shimmy Route

Williamstown Road, Port Melbourne to
Fitzroy Street, St Kilda via Bridge Street,
Esplanade West and East, Liardet Street/Richardson St
to Kerferd Road then Page Street, Park Road,
York Road and Loch Street
 
  • Line marking and surface treatments
  • Speed cushions along Richardson Street, York Street,
    Loch Street, Bridge Street, Esplanade East, Cruikshank Street and Liardet Street
  • Wayfinding signage 
TBC 
Albert Park Schools Connector 

Beaconsfield Parade to Dorcas Street
via Foote Street and Nelson Road
 
  • Line marking and surface treatments
  • Speed cushions along Foote Street, Danks Street and Nelson Road
  • Wayfinding signage 
TBC 
Beaconsfield Parade – Marina Parade 
  • Line marking and surface treatments
  • Installing kerb separators and bollards for separated bike lanes
  • Wayfinding signage  
TBC 
Armstrong Street 
  • Line marking
  • Speed cushions west of Neville Street
  • Wayfinding signage 
TBC 
Carlisle Street 
  • Line marking and surface treatments 
  • Wayfinding signage 
TBC 

Darebin and Yarra connectors pop bike lanes routes

View a larger version of the map

From April 23, we announced planning for Darebin and Yarra Connectors/St Georges Road Off-road Routes and asked for community feedback. 

Darebin and Yarra Connectors: are intended to improve connections to surrounding suburbs and make the core link from Station Street to Wellington and Napier Streets more effective commuter routes to and from Melbourne’s CBD.

We outlined these would include a number treatments including:

  • line marking, on-road symbols, and audible tactile edge lines to help guide drivers and bike riders travel to their destinations
  • barrier kerbs and bollards to provide greater separation between drivers and people on bikes on approach to key intersections. 

We also indicated that while we’d make every effort to retain existing on-street parking some minor parking changes may be required.

St Georges Road Off-road Routes: are intended to improve bike riding access across the Merri Creek Trail to the Inner Circle Rail Trail, connecting the journey between Preston and Melbourne’s CBD.

We know safety is a key barrier to encouraging more bike riders on to the network, so we want to provide greater awareness and knowledge of existing bike routes for new and novice riders, while also informing existing riders of alternative route options.  

We outlined that these would include:

  • new and improved signage, road markings
  • way finding and maps to improve the north-south connectivity of existing bike infrastructure, including links to Melbourne’s CBD.

Listening to our community

 A community update about the Darebin and Yarra Connectors and the St Georges Road Off-road Routes was sent out to residents in Yarra and Darebin in late April. 

Since then, we have been out talking to residents and businesses and spoken to members of the community, we have also received emails and comments on our online map. 

This is what you told us and how we are responding. 

The western section 

A map of the western section
 

View a larger version of the map.

St Georges Road Off-road Routes

What is important to you?
  • Design 
  • Bike rider and pedestrian safety 

What you told us:

  • There are conflicts at key locations because of large numbers of people using the paths and crossings – mostly Merri Junction, Holden Street, Edinburgh Gardens and Merri Bridge and Westgarth Street
  • Bike riders are going too fast
  • Road surfaces need improvements, especially when moving from a path to a road
  • Other improvements you suggested included light sequencing at crossings, signage as well as making some wider and smoother.

What will we do:

Because this is a trial, we can’t do more permanent works - such as widening existing shared paths or make significant changes to crossings and pavement surfaces. 

We will investigate: 

  • Conflict between the different users
  • Road crossings
  • Visibility, comfort and safety through lighting and vegetation management
  • Signage to encourage users to use on and off-road routes.  

Design treatments 

We’ll use green surface treatments, refresh bike line marking and install bumpy edge lines to make it easier for bikes to travel south through the Merri Junction intersection. 

We’ll refresh surface markings on northbound off-road paths in Merri Junction and from Apperley St to Alfred Crescent as well as Merri Creek bridge.  

We’ll use special line marking (sharrows) in Apperley Street to support cars and bikes to share the road space.

Wellington / Delbridge / Falconer Streets

What’s important to you? 

  • Design
  • Road infrastructure and traffic management. 

What you told us

  • There are rider safety issues through roundabouts (esp. Hodgkinson, McKean Streets). You want bikes to have priority, you also want to slow cars and use green surface treatments. 
  • Key intersections need safety improvements (Alexandra Parade, Queens Parade), including visibility and bike 'triggers' to activate crossing signals, as well as improving surfaces and kerbs around Queens Parade intersection. 
  • Better signage for road users and address ‘disappearing’ lanes (Smith Street to Turnbull Street and Queens Parade to George Street)
    minimise the impact of speed humps (Delbridge Street) and other existing infrastructure on bike journeys.

What we will do

The connectors work with the current road layout and are designed to support more people to access the permanent bike riding lanes at Wellington and Napier Streets. 

Following construction, we’ll continue to monitor community feedback and network performance, incorporating community ideas into the design, installation and adjustments of the lanes after they’re in place.

We will continue to work with other authorities to consider other longer-term solutions. 

Design treatments

We’ll enhance bike rider safety through roundabouts, improve the visibility and priority of bikes by using green surface treatments, and by supporting cars to share the road space with bikes. 

The pop-up nature of the trial means we can’t do more permanent works on intersection signals at this stage, but we’ll track traffic patterns over time.

Pop up bike lanes

Napier Street/Queens Parade intersection

What’s important to you? 

  • Traffic management 
  • Design

What you told us

  • Improve safety, signalling and efficiency of key local crossings (Alexandra Parade, Alfred Crs, Queens Parade, Napier Street and Georges Rd) to better cater to the volume of users. 
  • Improve transitions to Edinburgh Gardens, including providing bike priority across Alfred Crs, using signage and line marking as well as improving the surface smoothness. 
  • The need to consider local business deliveries in Napier Street as well as access difficulties arising from the current parking configuration and regulations.

What we will do

We’ll investigate future options to improve signalling for bikes and pedestrians at key crossings as well as short term surface improvements and opportunities to improve access to off road paths. 

We’ll install some turn restrictions at Napier Street and Queens Parade to separate bike riders and drivers in the intersection, while ensuring access for residents and businesses.  

We’ll work with relevant authorities and projects to coordinate our communications and works programs to minimise disruptions.  

We also know that the movement for bikes through Edinburgh Gardens is a preferred route for many riders, as it provides a safe and comfortable connection. However, we understand community concerns about high bike volumes and speeds, so we’re collecting bike speed and volume data to understand the extent of changes in behaviour as well as encouraging faster riders to use alternative routes.  

Design treatments

We’ll use green and yellow surface treatments to create space for bike riders and pedestrians to cross Queens Parade.  

We’ll change some vehicle movements and use signage to provide guidance:

  • Drivers heading westbound on Queens Parade will access Napier Street south via the westbound service lane opening 30 metres prior to Napier Street.
  • Drivers heading southbound on Napier Street will access Napier Street south by first turning left at Queens Parade before making a u- turn at the centre median opening 30 metres beyond Napier St and accessing the westbound service lane.

To ensure access for residents and businesses we will remove a single parking space in the westbound service road (which has been discussed with the stakeholder) and will ensure vehicles do not park within the required 10m clearance zones, through updated signage.

Around the Edinburgh Gardens area, we are also installing clear messaging around route options for faster riders, and emphasising that riders and pedestrians around the Edinburgh Gardens area should ‘share with care’.

These works support a broader, separate package of works for the overall improvement of the Napier St Cycling Corridor. The Napier Street Cycling Upgrade project is a key feature of the Inner North Cycling Corridor and is an innovative 2-kilometre bike riding route and safety upgrade along Napier Street, Fitzroy.  

Westgarth Street

What’s important to you?

  • Road improvements

What you told us

  • Improve pavement surface of the bike lanes
  • Improve the condition of the line marking along Westgarth Street
  • Improve the transition into Merri Creek trails 
  • Improve signage 
  • You are concerned about potential parking loss and that the volume of traffic may increase bike and car conflicts.

What we will do 

Because this is a trial, we are not able to do major works on road surfaces, however we’ll improve line marking and investigate options for short term surface improvements, as well as opportunities to improve access and use of off-road paths. 

Design treatments

We will use a number of treatments to help guide drivers and bike riders including refreshing line marking, installing on-road symbols and bumpy edge lines on existing bike lanes, as well as green surface treatments at intersections.  Access to the off-road paths will also be improved.

Our project scope does not include major road resurfacing works, but we will treat areas of concern within the bike lanes as needed.

We’re making every effort to retain existing on-street parking, however so that bikes have adequate space to travel safely, a single parking bay will be removed, which has been discussed with the relevant stakeholder.

In the Eastern Section 

Darebin and Yarra Connectors map

View a larger version of the map.

Victoria Road and Jeffrey Street

What’s important to you?

  • Design improvements 
  • Safety of bike riders. 

What you told us

  • Improve the Separation Street intersection, signage, to ban some vehicle (turning) movements and to improve visibility through the intersection. 
  • You are concerned about the widths of existing bike lanes and suggest installing wider/protected bike lanes both at the intersection as well as more generally down Victoria Road. 
  • You are concerned about safety of users through the Westgarth Street intersection and about congestion 
  • Options to improve pedestrian safety were also raised including a 'wombat' crossing at Clifton Street.

What we’re doing 

We will use a number of treatments to help guide drivers and bike riders as they travel along the street including refreshing line marking, installing on-road symbols and audible tactile edge lines on existing bike lanes, as well as green surface treatments at intersections.  

At key intersections we’re encouraging bike riders and drivers to share the road and using treatments to increase the visibility of bikes. 

 

Design treatments

We’re making some changes to key intersections along Victoria Road:

Westgarth and Jeffrey Streets: 

We’ll use green surface treatments and bike boxes to increase rider visibility and encourage bike riders and drivers to share the road. 
Separation St: 

  • Using green surface treatments to increase bike rider visibility
  • Using on-road markings to clearly mark out a shared left-turn only for cars and through or left movement for bikes 
  • Using linemarking beyond the intersection to create a dedicated bike lane

Bastings Street

  • Using green surface treatments to increase bike rider visibility
  • Using on-road markings to change the through and left lane to a shared left-turn only for cars and through or left movement for bikes

We’ve made every effort to retain existing on-street parking, however, providing adequate space for bike riders to travel safely  means a total of five parking bays will be removed, which has been discussed with the relevant stakeholders.

Station Street 

What’s important to you?

  • Safety
  • Parking 

What you told us

You are concerned about the safety of bike riders and potential for bike and bus conflict as well as the close proximity of general traffic.  
potential impacts on customer parking in the strip shopping area and suggestions that Victoria Road is a better alternative with greater connectivity.

What we’re doing 

Station St is a busy location, especially around the shopping area and level crossing. It's an important link for people accessing the local shops as well as those heading toward Heidelberg Road by car, by bike or on foot. 

Where there is enough space in other sections, we will provide clear bike lanes with line marking, as well as vibraline and green surface treatments. These treatments support drivers and riders to know where to position themselves on the road. 

Other north-south connectors in the area, including Victoria Road, will also be updated, to support riders connecting with the Heidelberg Road Link to the CBD.

Design treatments

We will use a number of treatments to help guide drivers and bike riders as they travel along the street, including refreshed line marking and bumpy edge lines on existing bike lanes. 

We will retain full car access and parking in the shopping area. To support drivers and bike riders to share the lane at this location, we will use special on-road markings (sharrows).

Green surface treatments will also be used at key intersections. At the Mitchell Street intersection, a yellow surface treatment will be used to create additional space for pedestrians and make it easier to cross.

We’re trialling up to 20kms of new and improved pop-up bike routes around Footscray, Seddon, and Yarraville. 

We’ll link existing bike lanes and off-road routes using a mix of local and main roads. The pop-up links will provide better local connections in and around central Footscray and make it easier for bike riders to get to and from Melbourne’s CBD. 

The Footscray area includes a number of major projects like West Gate Tunnel Project and Footscray Hospital. When completed, these will significantly change transport movements in the area.  

The Footscray Pop-Up Links are forerunners to these works and support Maribyrnong City Council’s Integrated Transport Strategy and Bicycle Strategy 2020-2030.

Maribyrnong Footscray CBD Link Cycling_Map_600x616px

View a larger version of the map

Community feedback

We’ve been consulting with the community on our proposed designs since October 2021. During this time, we’ve received over 300 online comments, door knocked over 200 residents and businesses and spoken directly with 90 people.

You can continue to provide comments and suggestions about the pop-up routes for the duration of the trial via our online map

Read on to learn more about what you’ve told us so far.

What you told us

  • Online comments largely centred around issues or improvements to assist individuals to get around.
  • When we were doorknocking, the response was largely positive about the proposed changes. 
  • A number of comments requesting more separated bike lanes, permanent infrastructure and filling gaps in the network. 
  • Some concerns about cyclist safety issues and questions about why particular treatments have been chosen over others. 
How we're responding 

Cross, Errol, Buckingham, Victoria and Raleigh Streets

What did we hear? 

There was overall support for the design, improved paths and proposed roundabout. 

We also heard that separation along Buckley Street and Victoria Street, improved bike lane visibility at Cross Street, Buckingham Street and Errol Street and improved connections to Barkley Village were important.  

What are we doing?

As we coordinate our project with utilities upgrades, we will explore further design options to address safety and parking around Cross, Errol, Buckingham, Victoria and Raleigh Streets.

Nicholson and Droop Streets

What did we hear? 

There was overall appreciation for our proposals and additional infrastructure as well as the proposed roundabout at Victoria Street. 

We also heard requests for a more direct east to west route as well as improved separation on Barkly Street and Hopkins Street, improved connectivity and safety on Ballarat Road and improved access to schools. 

What are we doing?

The designs for these streets provide an immediate stronger connection from Footscray Park in the north, to central Footscray. 

More direct east to west routes are part of state and local government longer term planning.

Moreland, Bunbury and Hyde Streets 

What did we hear?

There was overall appreciation for proposals and intersection improvements at Moreland Street. 

We also heard comments about missing links and suggestions for improved safety from the Dynon Road bike path to central Footscray, as well as Central Footscray to Sunshine.

What are we doing?

The designs for these streets provide an immediate stronger connection from Dynon Road shared use path to central Footscray. Pedestrian safety improvements will also support access to Footscray Station. 

More direct east to west routes are part of state and local government longer term planning. 

Parker Street 

What did we hear? 

There was overall support for proposed links to Dynon Road. 

We also heard separated bike lanes on Napier Street and Parker Street and calls to address the missing link between Central Footscray and Footscray Road off-street bike path.

What are we doing?

The existing layout and parking arrangements limit what we can achieve on Parker Street, however the design provides an immediate improvement from Footscray Road shared use path, to central Footscray. 

More direct east to west routes are part of state and local government longer term planning.

Albert Street 

What did we hear? 

There was overall support for separation and improvements to the Albert Street, Buckley Street intersection. 

We also heard some comments about connectivity to central Footscray, with calls for more separated bike lanes throughout the area and improved traffic signals at the intersection of Albert Street and Buckley Street. 

What are we doing?

As we coordinate our project with utilities upgrades, we will explore further design options to address safety and parking along Albert Street.

Charles Street

What did we hear? 

There was overall support for the proposals to improve the on road painted bike lane. 

We also heard commentary about the lack of separation and changes to on street parking. Suggestions include improved safety measures on Charles Street and the Victoria Street, Buckley Street intersection. 

What are we doing?

The design for Charles Street improves protection for bike riders while minimising changes to parking for local residents.  A new zebra crossing at the Charles and Victoria Street intersection will improve pedestrian access to Seddon Village.  

Hyde Street

What did we hear? 

There was overall support for the proposed design and improved connectivity to Williamstown. 

We also heard some commentary about cyclist’s proximity to parked cars and the connection between Schilds Street and Hyde Street. Suggestions include wider bike paths to avoid potential conflicts and increasing the landing/footpath area at Napier Street. 

What are we doing?

As we coordinate the project with utilities upgrades, we will further explore design options to address safety and access on Hyde Street, including local initiatives to reduce speed limits on local roads.  

Pilgrim and Bristow Streets 

What did we hear?

There was overall support for intersection improvements and the proposed roundabout at Bristow St. We also heard some commentary about separation on Pilgrim Street, traffic calming and textured road surfaces. 

What are we doing?

As we coordinate our project with utilities upgrades, we will explore further design options to address safety and access around the Footscray CBD Primary School. 

Other local streets

We received few comments relating to proposals for Pentland Parade, Stephen Street, Sommerville Road, Princess Street and Schild Street and will proceed with the design proposals and continue to monitor community feedback.

What we’re doing and when

We’ll complete most of our works between Tuesday, 12 April 2022 and Thursday, 30 June 2022, subject to weather, local conditions and other works scheduled in the local area. 

Preliminary works will take place over two weeks from Tuesday, 12 April 2022. 

Importantly, we’re coordinating our pop-up works with essential utility upgrades for the Footscray Hospital and Footscray Station. This means our works will need to take place in stages. 

Locations affected by the utility upgrades will follow from mid-2022.

Follow updates on our online map

What to expect

We’ll undertake most of the works at night to ensure drivers and workers safety and to minimise disruptions.

We'll minimise disruption to the local area as far as possible; however, for the safety of the community and our workers some vehicle noise and lights are unavoidable. Once works are complete, a thorough clean-up of the site will be undertaken.

Works being carried out are dependent on weather conditions. Therefore, dates are subject to change.  

We started with the Heidelberg Road Link in December 2020 to improve connections from Darebin to the CBD. 

The Heidelberg Road link provides a combination of separated bike lanes on busy roads, new signage and line markings along quieter streets, and better connections to our on- and off-road networks. 

This link fixes a key gap in the network across Merri Creek, making it safer and more direct for over 80,000 residents who live within five minutes, to ride to work, school and the local council areas of Darebin and Banyule. It also provides improved options for people who live along the Hurstbridge train line. 

What’s been achieved?

Our monitoring shows a steady increase in average of weekly riders. Ridership has increased from around 5000 per week in January to around 6000 per week in March, including a significant increase in female riders (from 16% to 30% of riders) since installation. Comments from users of the pop-up bike lanes indicate most people now feel safer on Heidelberg Road, and observations indicate more children and families are using the road.

Bike riders around Heidelberg Road are now experiencing improved connections from Wingrove Street in Fairfield to Alexandra Parade in Collingwood along with connections to the Wellington Street bike lanes into the CBD.

Pop up bike lanes map Dec 2020

View a larger version of the map.

See our before and after video to see what the Pop-Up Bike Lanes look like in action.

Listening and responding to our community  

Since the Heidelberg Road Link pop-up bike lanes were installed, we have heard from the community and businesses about a range of needs. We have been engaging with community and businesses to understand those needs further. We aim to respond by providing short-term set down and pick-up opportunities, improving vehicle turn movements and providing additional localised car and bike parking opportunities.

We have received overwhelming community support for the Heidelberg bike lanes but as promised, we have also continued to listen to the local community, including local businesses with regard to some changes we may need to make to better accommodate local needs, whilst still ensuring the function of the Heidelberg Road link is not compromised. 

We aim to respond by providing short-term set down and pick-up opportunities, improving vehicle turn movements and providing additional localised car and bike parking opportunities.

  • Between Arthur Street and Station Street we have returned five car parking spaces for customers for loading and pick up/drop off. 
  • Between Station Street and Panther Place we will trial a 15-minute loading bay between 11am - 3pm from Monday to Saturday. This trial will be in place for three months.
  • Adjacent to Fairfield Park Drive we have returned five car parking spaces for Fairfield Park users and residents
  • Since initial installation, we have made a number of other adjustments based on our ongoing monitoring and community feedback. 

Some of these changes include:

  • Tightening the bike lane entry at key points so that drivers and bike riders know where they should be
  • Adjusting bollard placement for better property access
  • Adjusting bollard placement for safer U-turns at Westgarth Street
  • Maintaining left-hand turn access from Jeffrey Street to Heidelberg Road
  • Updating signage on the approach to the Wellington Street and Alexandra Parade intersection to alert drivers to changed turn conditions.

A bike rider in a pop up bike lane

Recently, we have heard from residents in Clifton Hill who are concerned about intersections at Fenwick Street and Heidelberg Road and Roseneath Street and Hoddle Street. Most comments are about traffic buildup. 

Traffic build up in this areas is a long standing issue, and some queuing is to be expected. However, based on community feedback to the recent road layout changes, we are actively reviewing the design, signals and traffic impacts at these locations. 

This review can take up to 4 weeks. Depending on the identified solutions, resolution may take up to an additional 6 weeks, especially if physical changes to the road environment are required. 

We will post regular updates here. 

 

We’re installing up to 23kms of new and improved pop-up bike routes in Moonee Ponds.

The routes include 3kms of pop-up bike lanes on Mount Alexander Road, with an additional 20kms of new and improved bike routes across Moonee Ponds and Essendon.

The centrepiece will be new and improved pop-up bikes lanes along sections of Mount Alexander Road. They will connect to existing bike routes, stations, schools, local activity centres and green spaces.

The bike routes will also provide congestion relief for the Moonee Ponds Creek Trail, with improved 24/7, all-weather on-road routes.

These improvements to bike routes in Moonee Ponds support Moonee Valley City Council’s Integrated Transport Plan and Moonee Valley’s 2040 Strategy.

Pop-Up Bike Lanes_Moonee Ponds map

View a larger version of the map

Community feedback

We’ve been consulting with the community on our proposed designs for Moonee Ponds since December 2021. 

The feedback received is invaluable and helps inform our next stage of design to create pop-up bike routes that strike the right balance for everyone in the community. 

You can continue to provide comments and suggestions about the pop-up routes for the duration of the trial via our  online map.

Read on to learn more about what you’ve told us so far. 

Pop up Bike Lanes info graphic

What you told us

  • There was overall support and positive feedback for the proposed routes and safety improvements, in particular on Mount Alexander Road
  • Requests to install more permanent separation between cars and bike riders
  • Calls for further improvements at intersections to increase safety and prioritisation for bike riders and pedestrians
  • Suggestions for additional routes along Puckle Street
  • Concerns about bike rider safety and congestion along Mount Alexander Road. 

How we’re responding 

Mt Alexander Road

What did we hear?

Mount Alexander Road pop-up bike lanes Overall support for safety improvements, including new and improved bike lanes and intersection improvements. Some concerns about parking changes and congestion due to the use of existing road space to create dedicated bike lanes in each direction. We’re exploring some additional changes between Kellaway Avenue to Puckle Street to further improve safety for bike riders. Following your feedback, we will proceed with the proposed designs for Mount Alexander Road and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

What are we doing?

We’re exploring some additional changes between Kellaway Avenue to Puckle Street to further improve safety for bike riders. Following your feedback, we will proceed with the proposed designs for Mount Alexander Road and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

Park Street Connector – Locke Street to Mount Alexander Road

What did we hear?

Concerns about the proposed route due to bus services, as well as safety for bike riders during school hours. We also heard concerns about Cliff Street being too narrow to provide a safe option for bike riders, as well as congestion concerns if Sherbourne Street becomes one-way. 

What are we doing?

We considered bus operations when designing the routes and do not anticipate service impacts. Large change is not proposed to the existing shared road environment. Locke and Cliff streets were also selected due to their proximity to the new pedestrian operated signal crossing on Buckley Street. Following your feedback, we will proceed with proposed designs for the Park Street Connector and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

Cliff Street Connector – Shamrock Street to Park Street

What did we hear?

Support for safety improvements along this corridor. Some concerns about bike rider safety on McPhail Street. 

What are we doing?

McPhail Street was selected due to its proximity to the new pedestrian operated signal crossing on Buckley Street. Following your feedback, we will proceed with proposed designs for the Cliff Street Connector and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

Salisbury Street Connector – The Strand to Moonee Ponds Creek Trail

What did we hear?

Requests for more direct routes using Queens Park. 

What are we doing?

There’s currently a cycling ban in Queens Park, however we’ll work with Moonee Valley City Council to investigate this option. Following your feedback, we will proceed with proposed designs for the Salisbury Street Connector and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

Vine Street Connector – Moonee Ponds Junction to Moonee Ponds Creek Trail

What did we hear?

Overall support for safety improvements and proposed changes. Some concerns about congestion and noise due to the new stop signs. 

What are we doing?

Moonee Valley City Council has existing projects planned to improve connections between Dean and Dawson streets. A new shared use path is also planned as part of the Moonee Ponds Racecourse redevelopment. To further improve safety at the intersection of Vine Street and Stuart Street, we’re proposing a mini roundabout at this location instead of new stop signs. This will provide equal priority to all road users and reduce vehicle speeds. Following your feedback, we will proceed with proposed designs for the Vine Street Connector and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

Travancore Connector – Pattison Street to Mooltan Street

What did we hear?

Overall support for the proposed route along Myrong Crescent to Baroda Street and requests for additional east-west routes. 

What are we doing?

We will explore the possibility of future east-west connections through pop-up routes in the City of Moreland. More direct routes are also part of longer term state and local government planning. Following your feedback, we will proceed with proposed designs for the Travancore Connector and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

Fletcher Street – Moonee Valley City Council delivering this improvement

What did we hear?

Calls to improve existing line marking and requests to make further changes at the intersection of Mount Alexander Road. 

What are we doing?

We will improve existing line marking on Fletcher Street as part of the trial. Additional improvements at the Mount Alexander Road intersection are beyond the scope of our current program. In collaboration with Moonee Valley City Council, we will proceed with proposed designs for Fletcher Street and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

Middle Street Pedestrian Operated Signal (POS) – Moonee Valley City Council delivering this improvement

What did we hear?

Strong support for safety improvements and the new POS.

What are we doing?
In collaboration with Moonee Valley City Council, we will proceed with proposed designs for the Middle Street POS and continue to monitor community feedback throughout the trial.

What we’re doing and when 

Works for the pop-up bike routes across Moonee Valley are scheduled from 9 May to mid-2022.  

We’ll be updating our online map with what’s happening, where and when on a regular basis. 

If you live on one of our bike routes, watch out for a works notification in your letterbox.   

What to expect 

For all works, noise levels will be mostly low, with trucks, people and specialised equipment working near the site. We will minimise disruption to the local area as much as possible; however, some vehicle noise and lights are unavoidable due to safety requirements for our workers and the local community. 

Some of the works will be carried out at night to ensure driver and worker safety and to minimise disruptions. 

Access to properties and businesses will be maintained at all times throughout the works.

Once works are complete, a thorough clean-up of the site will take place. 

Works being carried out are dependent on weather conditions. Therefore, dates are subject to change.  

 

Get involved

Let us know your thoughts by making a comment or suggestion(External link) on our online map. 

Project timeline
Dates Description Milestone Status (Completed/Current/Upcoming
)
October-December 2020 Planning & design Completed
December 2020- June 2022 Progressive roll out of pop up lanes and engagement (starting with Heidelberg Rd link) across inner city areas Current
December 2021 - onwards Ongoing monitoring and engagement  Upcoming

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